Dealing with Inexperience Can Ruin the Deal

The 65-year old owner of a multi-location retail operation doing $30 million in annual sales decided to retire.  He interviewed a highly recommended intermediary and was impressed.  However, he had a nephew who had just received his MBA and who told his uncle that he could handle the sale and save him some money.  He would do it for half of what the intermediary said his fee would be – so the uncle decided to use his nephew.  Now, his nephew was a nice young man, educated at one of the top business schools, but he had never been involved in a middle market deal.  He had read a lot of case studies and was confident that he could “do the deal.”

Inexperience # 1 – The owner and the nephew agreed not to bring the CFO into the picture, nor execute a “stay” agreement.  The nephew felt he could handle the financial details.  Neither one of them realized that a potential purchaser would expect to meet with the CFO when it came to the finances of the business, and certainly would expect the CFO to be involved in the due diligence process.

Inexperience # 2 – It never occurred to the owner or his nephew that revealing just the name of the company to prospective buyers would send competitors and only mildly interested prospects to the various locations.  There was no mention of Confidentiality Agreements.  Since the owner was not in a big hurry, there were no time limits set for offers or even term sheets.  It would only be a matter of time before the word that the business was on the market would be out.

Inexperience # 3 – The owner wanted to spend some time with each prospective purchaser.  Confidentiality didn’t seem to be an issue.  There was no screening process, no interview by the nephew.

Inexperience # 4 – The nephew prepared what was supposed to be an Offering Memorandum.  He threw some financials together that had not been audited, which included a missing $500,000 that the owner took and forgot to inform his nephew about.  This obviously impacted the numbers.  There were no projections, no ratios, etc.  This lack of information would most likely result in lower offers or bids or just plain lack of buyer interest.  In addition, the mention of a pending lawsuit that could influence the sale was hidden in the Memorandum.

Inexperience # 5 – The owner and nephew both decided that their company attorney could handle the details of a sale if it ever got that far.  Unfortunately, although competent, the attorney had never been involved in a business sale transaction, especially one in the $15 million range.

Results — The seller was placing almost his entire net worth in the hands of his nephew and an attorney who had no experience in putting transactions together.  The owner decided to call most of the shots without any advice from an experienced deal-maker.  Any one of these “inexperiences” could not only “blow” a sale, but also create the possibility of a leak.  The discovery that the company was for sale could be catastrophic, whether discovered by the competition, an employee, a major customer or a supplier .

The facts in the above story are true!

The moral of the story – Nephews are wonderful, but inexperience is fraught with danger.  When considering the sale of a major asset, it is foolhardy not to employ experienced, knowledgeable professionals.  A professional intermediary is a necessity, as is an experienced transaction attorney.

Copyright: Business Brokerage Press, Inc.

Nyul/BigStock.com

suncoastDealing with Inexperience Can Ruin the Deal
read more

The Variables that Drive and Influence Business Valuations

If you’ve never bought or sold a business before, then the factors that drive and influence business valuations likely seem a bit murky.  In a recent Divestopedia article from Kevin Ramsier entitled, “A Closer Look at What Drives and Influences Business Valuations,” Ramsier takes a closer look at this important topic. 

Business brokers and M&A advisors play a key role in helping business owners understand why their business receives the valuation that it does.  No doubt, the final assessed value is based on a wide array of variables.  But with some effort, clarity is possible.

In his article, Ramsier points out that “value means different things to different buyers” and that the “perceived value depends on the circumstances, interpretation and the role that is played in a transition.”  It is important to remember that no two businesses are alike.  For that reason, what goes into a given valuation will vary, often greatly. 

Looking to EBITDA

Ramier points to several metrics including return on assets, return on equity and return on investment.  Another important valuable for companies with positive cash flow is a multiple of EBITDA, which stands for “earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization.”  EBITDA is widely used in determining value.  On the flip side of the coin, if the company in question has a negative cash flow, then the liquidation value of the business will play a large role in determining its value.

Primary Drivers to Consider

Ramsier provides a guideline of Primary Drivers of Valuation, Secondary Drivers of Valuation and Other Potential Drivers of Valuation.  In total there are 25 different variables listed, which underscores the overall potential complexity of accurately determining valuation. 

In the Primary Drivers of Valuation list, Ramsier includes everything from the size of revenue and revenue stability to historical and projected EBITDA as well as potential growth and margin percentages.  Other variables, ones that could easily be overlooked, such as the local talent pool and people training are also listed as variables that should be considered.

Support for the Business Owner

The bottom line is that determining valuation is not a one-dimensional affair, but is instead a dynamic and complex process.  One of the single best moves any business owner can make is to reach out to an experienced business broker. Since business brokers are experts in determining valuation, owners working with brokers will know what to expect when the time comes to sell.

Copyright: Business Brokerage Press, Inc.

Kuprevich/BigStock.com

suncoastThe Variables that Drive and Influence Business Valuations
read more

Is Your Business Really Worth Handing Over to the Next Generation?

Before you begin your business, you should be thinking about how you will hand that business over to someone else.  No one runs a business forever.  Whether you sell your business or let a relative inherit it, at some point you will need to step away. 

When you finally do separate from your business, it is critical that you are certain that it is worth handing over.  In his January 2019 article in Forbes magazine entitled “Make Sure Your Business is Worth Handing Over,” author Francois Botha dives in and explores this very topic.

In this article, Botha emphasizes that family businesses should not “fall into the trap of prioritizing job creation for their children.”  Instead, that the priority should be to perpetuate the business.  Botha cites the co-founder and chairman of The Leadership Pipeline Institute, Stephen Drotter, who feels that the main goal of any business needs to be its suitability.

Drotter established five principles designed to assist family businesses as they seek to prepare for succession.  The first principle is to “Identify and Fix Your Problems.”  Current ownership should deal promptly with any business problems before passing a business on to a new generation.

The second principle Drotter covers is to “Adjust Your Management to the Strategic Evolution of Your Business.”  Businesses evolve from the creation of a product to sell to focusing on sales, marketing and distribution to finally addressing a plateau in sales which facilitates the need for multi-functional management.

The third principle cited by Drotter is “Talk to Your People About Them.”  In this principle, communication with employees is key.  Getting to know and understand employees is vital.

“Be on the Lookout for Talent Everywhere,” is the fourth principle.  There is no replacement for skilled and motivated employees, and you never know where you may find them.

Finally, the fifth principle, “Provide Development” emphasizes that “almost everything is learned, and somebody often taught that which is learned.”  Employee skill must be seen as a key priority.

Making sure that a business is ready for transition to the next generation involves careful preparation and a good deal of advanced planning.  The sooner that you begin asking the right kind of thoughtful questions about the current state of your business and what will benefit it moving forward, the better off everyone will be.

Copyright: Business Brokerage Press, Inc.

gstockstudio/BigStock.com

suncoastIs Your Business Really Worth Handing Over to the Next Generation?
read more